Wise Guys

A wandering mind with feet to match. I've always been a hippie, recently a nerd, but mostly a primate.
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This blog may contain disturbing or gory images, mostly related to conservation issues like hunting or animal abuse. Proceed with caution if you are sensitive.

scientiflix:

Victims of the trade: Gibbon rescue in Thailand

It’s no holiday for the gibbons of Thailand. Habitat loss, poaching for traditional medicine and the cruel capture of baby gibbons for both the pet and tourism trade have left all but one species threatened or endangered. Luckily the Gibbon Rehabilitation Project in Phuket is looking to change this. Join us as we tour the sanctuary and meet the gibbons that have been saved from the cruel fate of the tourism trade.

By: Earth Touch.

caleblogs:

In the nest.

caleblogs:

Mother and infant.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Mystical World Of Mushrooms Captured In Photos

Most people consider mushrooms to be the small, ugly cousins of the plant kingdom, but theirs is  surprisingly beautiful and wonderful world waiting to be explored. These beautiful mushrooms, captured by enthusiastic nature photographers, are a far cry from the ones you find in the woods or your local grocery store.

Most mushrooms, as we know them, are actually just the reproductive structure of the fungus they belong to – their fungal networks expand far further underground, and some fungi don’t even sprout the sort of mushrooms that we’re used to seeing. In fact, depending on your definition of “organism,” the largest living organism in the world is a fungus – there’s a honey mushroom colony in Oregon that occupies about 2,000 acres of land! ( Bored Panda )

(via bridgie)

currentsinbiology:


These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack
There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.
A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.


Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

currentsinbiology:

These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack

There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.

A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc