Wise Guys

A wandering mind with feet to match. I've always been a hippie, recently a nerd, but mostly a primate.
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This blog may contain disturbing or gory images, mostly related to conservation issues like hunting or animal abuse. Proceed with caution if you are sensitive.
somebones:

biologizeable it’s your husband/man-meat!

somebones:

biologizeable it’s your husband/man-meat!

(via cacajao)

amnhnyc:

The Museum’s Hall of Primates explores the mammalian order that includes apes, monkeys, and humans. The hall is divided into families, with displays that trace both shared characteristics and those unique to each group. For example, while many primates such as spider monkeys have long tails they use for grasping, apes, which have hands that are specialized for swinging from trees, do not have tails. 

Learn more about the Hall of Primates.

(via theoriginofthespecies)

Earlier today I was wondering what a bonobo would look like with a human nose.

I’ve made a terrible mistake…

thejunglenook:

theolduvaigorge:

Ebola vaccine success highlights dilemma of testing on captive chimps to save wild apes
from PhysOrg
“A study illustrates ‘high conservation potential’ of vaccines for endangered wild primates devastated by viral disease, but highlights need for access to captive chimpanzees so vaccines can be trialled before being administered in the wild. 
The first conservation-specific vaccine trial on captive chimpanzees has proved a vaccine against Ebola virus is both safe and capable of producing a robust immune response in chimpanzees. This unprecedented study, published in the journal PNAS, shows that ‘orphan’ vaccines - which never complete the expensive licensing process for human use - can be co-opted for use on wildlife and might be a godsend for highly endangered species such as gorillas and chimpanzees, say researchers.
They suggest that, by ending captive research in an effort to pay back an “ethical debt” to captive chimpanzees, the US Government is poised to “renege on an even larger debt to wild chimpanzees” at risk from viruses transmitted by tourists and researchers – as safety testing on captive chimpanzees is required before vaccines can be used in the wild.
"The ape conservation community has long been non-interventionist, taking a ‘Garden of Eden’ approach to modern medicine for wild animals, but we ended Eden by destroying habitats and spreading disease," said Dr Peter Walsh, the senior author on the study from the Division of Biological Anthropology, University of Cambridge, who conducted the trial at the New Iberia Research Centre in the US with researchers from the Centre, as well as the US Army, the University of Louisiana and the conservation charity Apes Incorporated (ApesInc.org). ”Half of deaths among chimps and gorillas that live in proximity to humans are from our respiratory viruses. For us it’s a sore throat - for them it’s death.”
"We need to be pragmatic about saving these animals now before they are wiped out forever, and vaccination could be a turning point. But park managers are adamant - and rightly so at this stage - that all vaccines are tested on captive apes before deployment in the wild. This means access to captive chimpanzees for vaccine trials." Infectious diseases pose extinction-level threats to African ape species on a par with poaching and habitat loss, say researchers, with populations continuing to be devastated by malaria, anthrax and "spillover" respiratory viruses - as well as massive Ebola outbreaks which had killed roughly one third of the world gorilla population by 2007" (read more).
(Source: PhysOrg)

Additional Resources:
What Ebola virus means for primate populations (www.4apes.com)
Ebola vaccine & Western Gorillas (www.animalresearch.info)
The VaccinApe Project (gorilla.wildlifedirect.org) and it’s founder Peter Walsh (University of Cambridge) 
Apes need vaccines too (www.NYtimes.com via TheJungleNook)

thejunglenook:

theolduvaigorge:

Ebola vaccine success highlights dilemma of testing on captive chimps to save wild apes

  • from PhysOrg

A study illustrates ‘high conservation potential’ of vaccines for endangered wild primates devastated by viral disease, but highlights need for access to captive chimpanzees so vaccines can be trialled before being administered in the wild. 

The first conservation-specific  trial on captive chimpanzees has proved a vaccine against Ebola virus is both safe and capable of producing a robust  in chimpanzees. This unprecedented study, published in the journal PNAS, shows that ‘orphan’ vaccines - which never complete the expensive licensing process for human use - can be co-opted for use on wildlife and might be a godsend for highly endangered species such as gorillas and chimpanzees, say researchers.

They suggest that, by ending captive research in an effort to pay back an “ethical debt” to captive chimpanzees, the US Government is poised to “renege on an even larger debt to wild chimpanzees” at risk from viruses transmitted by tourists and researchers – as safety testing on captive chimpanzees is required before vaccines can be used in the wild.

"The ape conservation community has long been non-interventionist, taking a ‘Garden of Eden’ approach to modern medicine for wild animals, but we ended Eden by destroying habitats and spreading disease," said Dr Peter Walsh, the senior author on the study from the Division of Biological Anthropology, University of Cambridge, who conducted the trial at the New Iberia Research Centre in the US with researchers from the Centre, as well as the US Army, the University of Louisiana and the conservation charity Apes Incorporated (ApesInc.org). ”Half of deaths among chimps and gorillas that live in proximity to humans are from our respiratory viruses. For us it’s a sore throat - for them it’s death.”

"We need to be pragmatic about saving these animals now before they are wiped out forever, and vaccination could be a turning point. But park managers are adamant - and rightly so at this stage - that all vaccines are tested on captive apes before deployment in the wild. This means access to captive chimpanzees for vaccine trials." Infectious diseases pose extinction-level threats to African ape species on a par with poaching and habitat loss, say researchers, with populations continuing to be devastated by malaria, anthrax and "spillover" respiratory viruses - as well as massive Ebola outbreaks which had killed roughly one third of the world gorilla population by 2007" (read more).

(Source: PhysOrg)

Additional Resources:

(via cacajao)

gradlifethrugifs:

Watching my friend’s dog has reminded me that although I love dogs and hope to have them again someday, a cat is way more my style and speed right now.

^^^ reasons why my current pet status is joint custody of a fish.

doctormemelordmd:

pan-pirate:

d-i-y-orgasms:

the-youngest-gandor-brother:

blackcr0wking:

fangirling-so-hard-rn:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

Crows are scary
They

  • use tools
  • Can be taught to speak (like parrots)
  • Have huge brains for birds
  • like seriously their brain-to-body size ratio is equal to that of a chimpanzee
  • They vocalize anger, sadness, or happiness in response to things
  • they are scary smart at solving puzzles
  • some ravens stay with their mates until one of them dies
  • they can remember faces
  • SIDENOTE HERE BECAUSE HOLY SHIT.  They did an experiment where these guys wore masks and some of them fucked with crows.  Pretty soon the crows recognized the masks = douchebag.  But the nice guys with masks they left alone.  THEN, OH WE’RE NOT DONE, NO SIR crows that WEREN’T EVEN IN THE EXPERIMENT AND NEVER SAW THE MASK BEFORE knew about mask-dudes and attacked them on sight.  THEY PASSED ON THE FUCKING INFORMATION TO THEIR CROW BUDDIES.
  • They remember places where crows were killed by farmers and change their migration patterns.

Guys I’m really scared of crows now.
(q

i love crows so much

crows are amazing

My favorite legend is that crows are the souls of the dead

crows are the coolest shit

Yeah but have you seen this 

image

One extra note:

Crows have been shown to count. Now, this is different than simply being able to recognize a number of items instantly (a phenomenon called subitizing - read up, brains are fantastically cool). Rather, crows can learn and use numerical identities in real life scenarios. In a 2000 study by Smirnova et al., crows were trained to associate arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc.) to the number of items that they were supposed to choose from a group. In other words, when shown the number three, they knew to choose three items.

Plus they not only use tools, but manufacture tools appropriate to the task at hand.

Finally, they’re adorable fledglings.

http://cdn2.arkive.org/media/EC/EC4834DB-E6BA-4E86-8971-C327928B5A8D/Presentation.Large/american-crow-fledgling-at-base-of-tree-trunk.jpg

Refs: Smirnova, AA., Lazareva, OF., and Zorina, ZA. 2000. Use of number by crows: investigation by matching and oddity learning. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour 73:163-176. (pdf here)

(via anthrocentric)

seafluers:

tastefullyoffensive:

If Disney Princesses Were Actually Sloths by Jen Lewis

Previously: Nicolas Cage as Disney Princesses

This is so cute

(via conservationvip)

becausebirds:

DO YOU THINK THIS IS A GAME?

(via crotalinae)